That’s My Story and I’m Sticking To It

In my 20s, I attended a fair number of baby showers and pregnancy/childbirth-centric events.  It’s like a bad take-off of the Jane Austen line, “It is a truth universally acknowledged…”…that if you are a married woman in your 20s, you are interested in conceiving/pregnancy/birth.  As someone who was at best ambivalent about having babies (oh, the irony) at the time and more focused on going back to school, I found this emphasis frustrating.

When I arrived at 30, suddenly in a tearing hurry to have babies and getting into increasingly expensive, painful interventions that seemed to fail at every turn, the amount of social pressure turned into something far darker.  While there are areas of the US where women in their 30s having first babies is the norm, where I live, I was one of the oldest people in my peer group married with no kids.  Most of my friends have older kids, including a kid who is a teenager currently.

In the throes of infertility, I quit going to baby showers.  I stayed out of heavily female spaces because it felt like pregnancy/childbirth stories came up a surprising amount as a bonding activity.  I figured one day I’d get wherever “there” was to feel emotionally secure enough to start attending again.

I had the kids.  And then something strange happened: I still don’t belong.  Not really.

There’s more room for sharing of “less than optimal” experiences now than perhaps there once was, but there’s still a pretty heavy social price for relating certain parts of stories.  I’ve personally primarily experienced this in regards to miscarriages/pre-viable PPROM/NICU – so that’s what I’m writing about here – but I also know this happens in some very difficult ways in the infertility community as well for people for whom treatment doesn’t work or adoption doesn’t happen (because this isn’t my story to tell, here is an excellent blog post on that subject, as well as here).

The first time I naively waded into a discussion after my older daughter was born, I simply spoke part of the truth: that I’d been in the hospital for quite some time after my water broke at 21 weeks, the doctors thought the baby wouldn’t make it, I somehow stayed pregnant until 28w4d, and E was born, spent awhile in the NICU, and was now doing pretty well.  Never mentioned the infertility/IVF/miscarriages or the messiness of the subchorionic hematoma/hemorrhages.  I actually watched someone’s mouth drop open.  People weren’t sure what to say.  There was some shuffling and looking down and the subject got changed.  It wasn’t the last time this happened.  Eventually, I started being a lot quieter during these conversations.

“It’s like I’m Stephen King giving a speech at the romance writer’s convention,” I once quipped to Arthur.  I’ve also heard more than once complaints about how people love to tell expectant women the worst stories about infertility/pregnancy/childbirth and scare them.

Obviously, there’s an element of knowing your audience here and being polite or sensitive.  I don’t tell anxious pregnant women my story because of this, because they’ve got enough concerns going on.  There are times that people can’t handle certain stories and I get that.

But other times, there’s an element of silencing.  Stories that are too uncomfortable and too taboo to tell out loud.

As I was reading Sarah DiGregorio’s book on prematurity Early, a passage helped crystallize the vague sense of not-belonging I’ve felt at times: “I also didn’t want to be the bearer of dark information, and I couldn’t imagine how I would participate in ‘normal’ conversations about my baby.”  DiGregorio also notes that “The emphasis on ‘natural’ birth that is meant to be empowering can be painful for those of us who needed every unnatural intervention to get our babies (and/or ourselves) out alive.”

I hear that.

I know that I’m (thank goodness, as I wouldn’t wish this on anyone else) an extreme outlier to plenty of statistics.  Of people who struggle with infertility,less than 5% go on to use IVF according to the ASRM.  Subchorionic hematomas are one of the most common reasons for first trimester bleeding, but very few are anywhere near as problematic as mine turned out.  Periviable PPROM affects only around 0.4% of pregnancies.  While preterm birth is an enormous problem in the US, only a little less than 2% of all births and around 16-20% of preterm births are before 32 weeks’ gestation.  In other words, my experiences are definitely not the norm. I don’t think policies or procedures or public health should be based around women like me.

But the suggestion that anyone can (fill in the blank: get pregnant without intervention, get pregnant with intervention, prevent a miscarriage, give birth without certain interventions, prevent a c-section, etc.) has the weird effect of sort of erasing people like me who don’t fit into those narratives that we are ultimately in control.  At times, I’ve found it also can have the effect of almost turning my story into a spooky fairy-tale, the thing that lurks in the shadow, the uncomfortable specter at the feast.

It’s a tricky thing: I want women to be empowered to seek answers and have authority over their own bodies, I want to see fertility treatments covered by insurance but not hailed as ‘the’ solution to infertility, I want as many miscarriages as possible prevented but women not blamed for miscarrying, I want to see unnecessary c-sections curtailed and more choices for women but also the understanding that c-sections can be life-saving preserved, I want better public health to help prevent as many pre-term births as possible and also better NICUs/treatments for those that happen anyway, I want campaigns of information that can help people avoid bad outcomes but don’t ‘other’ or shame those that don’t fit or have less than optimal outcomes anyway.  I did nothing wrong and yet so much went sideways for me.  There was no extra prenatal care or information that would have helped me, there were d*mn good reasons I had c-sections, and I get very tired indeed at times of explaining why (fill in the blank) would not have prevented this, the suspicion that I had to have done something to make this happen because surely these things are preventable?

I don’t know the answer here.  I don’t know how we make space and genuine understanding for all of these realities.  Telling stories is a starting place, I suppose.

The Sisyphean Task of Bargaining

I was standing in the bathroom the Saturday evening before Christmas, getting ready for work, when Arthur appeared in the doorway.

“So, L called this afternoon,” he said slowly.  I inhaled sharply.  I knew the next words that would come out of his mouth.

“She’s pregnant.”

I stared at him miserably.  “How far?”

“Six weeks.”

“Oh,” I said.

~*~

It’s true that I would never wish the messiness I’ve been through on that quest on another person, and I stand by that sentiment.  I’m glad she’s not going through those things and I do hope all this works out well for her.

This happened to be the third pregnancy announcement of that week and I’d actually been pretty proud of myself for handling the others well.  I’d congratulated and been genuinely happy for them, even if there was a little achiness.  But the announcement of someone in the family (sister-in-law), someone I also happen to not get along with at all and have a whole ugly history concerning, felt like entirely too much.

~*~

The immediate effect was the utter destruction of the fragile détente Arthur and I had formed to get through the holidays and give ourselves a little bit more space about fertility and being done – or not.  It was one of the worst fights we’ve had in nearly 15 years of marriage, a conflict that encompassed weeks of silences, retreats, open clashes, sullen glares, smoldering irritation, and plenty of times when everything seemed fine on the surface as we worked together on the house, shuttled the kids around, or sat around together.  About the time we both figured we had to have exhausted the conflict, we found it hiding in the undone dishes, the mess in the bathroom, the recycling left on the kitchen counter.  Both of us wanted it to stop and neither of us could find a way to leave the trench we’d each dug.

My OB/GYN finally helped bring it to a more manageable level when I splattered infertility and failed IVF and jealousy all over the table by gently telling me that yes, with me at 37 and my history, we did not have time to wait forever.  “But you’re not doing more fertility treatments and three months is most likely not going to change your ability – or not – to get pregnant,” she said.  “Give it three months, breathe, then revisit how you and Arthur feel about this.”

~*~

None of this, of course, was truly about trying again.  With the permission to take that off the table and breathe, I could see that this was (again) about coming to terms with our fertility issues and the other things we’d put largely on hold in the thick of it.

I’ve wondered, for a while now, why I seemed to be stuck in the anger stage of grief.  L wounded me a couple of years ago and I just…haven’t been able to let it go.  Even though at some level, I’ve felt ready to do so for a long time now.  I was angry at Arthur for deciding he was done when it came to family building.  I was angry when the beta came back negative.

Ah, but grief is a tricky, slippery thing.  Because it turns out, I’m more in the bargaining stage of things.  It just doesn’t look like the examples I’ve seen given about bargaining, where people say things like “take me instead of my (fill in the blank)” or offer money or power.

For me, it looks much more like the famous myth of Sisyphus, rolling the rock up the hill every day, having it come tantalizingly near the top, only to have it roll back down.

If I can untangle the relationship with L, I can overcome the grief at being rejected by her as a sibling and also (not coincidentally) somehow cosmically make right the grief and loss of my brother’s death.  I will refuse to let this point of connection go – even if it takes the form of a horrible resentment that is incredibly unhealthy – because I can prove that I am worthy of this connection.  G-d knows I’m working hard enough at it. 

Roll, roll, roll…and it all comes crashing back down.

If I can persuade Arthur to try again, that is somehow going to make up for the miscarriages, the infertility, the disappointments, the bitterness. 

Up the hill goes the rock.  Down, down, down it comes again.

That’s bargaining.  The certainty that if I can succeed at these Sisyphean tasks, if I can get that d*mn rock to just stay put at the top, it will all be okay.

It is bitterly untrue.  Because a relationship with L, even if I theoretically could magically restore it to being BFFs and true sisters and all that (unlikely even under the best circumstances, we’re just very different people and there’s simply too much between us at this point), would never take the place of my brother.  Because trying on our own for a third child and/or the very real gratitude for my wonderful living children does not erase the miscarriages, add years back to my life/fertility, or put around $50,000 (preferably with interest) in my bank account.  Theoretically trying to have another child does not insulate us from the potential for loss in the future either.

I’m about a million years behind the times, but I was recently reading a Dear Sugar column by writer Cheryl Strayed, written in response to a woman who had experienced a devastating stillbirth.  “Nobody can intervene and make that right and nobody will. Nobody can take it back with silence or push it away with words. Nobody will protect you from your suffering. You can’t cry it away or eat it away or starve it away or walk it away or punch it away or even therapy it away,” Strayed wrote.  Her words hit me straight in the heart.

Nothing and nobody can bring Eric back.  Nothing and nobody can change the myriad number of small and large losses that encompass infertility/miscarriage.

It’s really easy at this point to start talking about how lucky I am (true) or how much privilege I have (a lot, also true).  It’s really tempting to slip back into the comfortable place that is denial, put up a nice wall in front of the rocks that are still sitting at the bottom of the hill.  While acknowledging and examining privilege is absolutely a worthy pursuit and feeling true gratitude is a marvelous thing, denial is neither of those.  It’s pretending that because other things have gone right, the grief isn’t there for the stuff that hasn’t.  Also tempting is kicking the rock in fury because, well, the thing should stay put at the top.

Whether it’s fair or not, those rocks aren’t staying at the top.

Recognizing that, and not forever taking fruitless runs at pushing them up – and ignoring people who tell me that surely one more run will do it or to please hide these unsightly boulders – is the challenge now.

Nope

The beta was negative.

It’s one of those sort of, well, moments, if you know what I mean – it’s by no means the end of the world or even up there among the cruelest moments infertility has dealt to me over the years, but it also just plain sucks.  Maybe because it’s such a reminder of the real cruelty of infertility, the part where you get your hopes up over and over and over again, only to have them dashed into the reality of a cancelled cycle or your period or blood at the wrong time or a negative beta or the scan that shows that the embryo is in the wrong place, doesn’t have a heartbeat, or is an empty sac.  It’s not so much the individual cr*ppy moment, it’s the compendium of varying degrees of cr*ppy, exhausting, or outright tragic days that make up a torturous drip that wears, bit by bit.

It’s also, a little, the pervasive sense of being a sucker who somehow allowed myself to go back to the glittery high-stakes roulette table that is fertility treatments and roll like I was going to win.  I know what those odds look like, and yet, somehow, allowed myself to get my hopes up.  Adding a bit of insult to injury, the RE that has – in the past – been fairly compassionate couldn’t be bothered to call with the beta results.  The nurse told me he wanted to “make sure I got the results earlier” (reality – it took around 7.5 hours from my blood draw to get the call and I had told them that I already knew it was negative as I’d taken a home pregnancy test beforehand) had a “full schedule” and would be “happy to offer us a post-cycle consult” but he knows that this was the end for us.  There’s no reason to go to the hassle of having my husband take off work and putting the kids in daycare.  We talked about it extensively at the pre-cycle consult. It stings that in the end, I didn’t merit even a five-minute phone call with tough news.

It’s the reminder that infertility still has a sting in its tail, long past the point I thought it could really wound me this deeply.

I don’t know what happens now.  We’re done with IVF and fertility treatments.  We don’t know whether or not to see if something breaks loose without medical assistance.  Or if that ship has just…sailed.  We’re lucky and exhausted and sad and grateful and angry all at the same time right now.  I guess mostly we now just sit with all the myriad emotions and live.

Coffee-Mug Philosophy

In my offline life, I’m in the process of some new stuff at my job that changes my workflow and sort of upends my established routines there.  It’s fine, positive even, and it’s something expected/planned but it’s amazing how much energy goes into change and re-configuring my habits.

The other day, these words fell out of my mouth: “It will be fine!  All this upheaval and hard stuff is going to make us stronger, right?”

Ironic, because I really hate that particular cliché.

~*~

I heard it quite a bit throughout the infertility journey: what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.  I heard it when Arthur went through job losses.  I heard it in NICU.  I’m grateful no one said it too me after my brother died because suicide pretty much flies in the face of that kind of gritty positivity.  But that statement has hovered in the background of most of the big, tough moments of my life.

I think – as with most “sound bite” or “meme-ready” sorts of statements – the reality is much more complex.  I also think sometimes it’s employed as a quick conversation ender or a way to escape big feelings.

There are hard experiences that I feel have made me stronger, mostly those that are designed to break down before building up.  Nursing school sucked.  It was terribly long hours often (getting up at 4:15 am to drive two hours to a clinical site, being there for 8-10 hours, then going home), the studying was a full-time job, and I have never forgotten my first semester lab where everyone cried at least once except for the two students who had been in the military.  It was also truly worth it and the toughness was incredibly important when I got into real world and took my first assignment on a general medical-surgical/telemetry floor.

Some of the job losses for Arthur fall into this category as well.  It was sort of a surprise to me that after Arthur’s first job loss, the sky didn’t fall and we figured things out.  We were really privileged in many ways, but the experience helped me better hone savings plans and recognize that while it was 100% not optimal, it was survivable.

But as far as some of the infertility experiences go?  Being told there was no heartbeat?  Sitting in a hospital bed being told that I was ruptured and going to lose our very wanted baby?  Waiting in NICU for test results to come back to see if E had NEC?  Losing my brother?  No.

That sh*t broke me to the very core.

I mean, there’s a way in which all these experiences have given me a lot of perspective.  Going through all that reminds me on the days where all the little ridiculous stuff is piling up and it’s frustrating that I’ve survived so much worse.  That I will make it through that day.  I’m much better now at differentiating my small life stuff from what constitutes my bigger life stuff and reacting accordingly.  It’s also made me more able to take some forms of tension or frustration in stride, because, well, I can manage.  In that sense, the adage is correct.  Perspective is valuable in life, absolutely.

What the saying doesn’t reflect, however, is that there are some really ugly broken, jagged edges that are still in the process of being smoothed.  It doesn’t reflect the big ways in which these events changed the course, not always for the better.

I started out in elder care as a nursing assistant when I was 19 years old.  I loved it.  I always envisioned myself as a hospice nurse eventually.  I did some clinical time with hospice and felt confirmed in that calling.  Even when I started in the “real world”, I took assignments that would give me experience.

Then infertility hit and I was just so sad.  Conflicted.  Too many emotions running rampant to step back and be in a high-emotion field like hospice.  I put the dream on hold, mentally, and moved forward with a different path hoping to eventually move back that direction.  Then all the losses happened, NICU happened, and my brother died.

Now, I work in an area where I come in contact with the “hard stuff”, but in far more limited doses than a field like hospice.  It’s a good balance, I’m good at it, and I’m happy.

But I still mourn, a bit, that I had to admit that infertility, miscarriage, prematurity, and suicide loss limited me.  Maybe someday, but it will be years and a lot of therapy if hospice is ever back in my path.  I won’t do it unless I know my stuff is fully handled and integrated.

Empathy is another sort of mixed bag in life after everything.  On the one hand, I know these experiences have made me more empathetic in many ways.  I definitely can identify with people’s struggles and have a better ability to be present in those moments.

But it’s also made it far easier – especially when I’m tired, stressed, overwhelmed, or overstimulated – to fall into a pain Olympics sort of mentality or get really jealous.  I don’t think this is true for everyone by any means, but it’s definitely an issue for me.  I’m ashamed to admit that even while I was very happy for my BIL and SIL when they got pregnant, I was positively green with envy that they had gotten pregnant with twins on their first fertility treatment.  It threw me back mentally into every f*cking failed cycle and miscarrying twins on that first hopeful IVF.  I was happy for them but absolutely overwhelmed also at how sad and angry I was for my own losses.  This resolved with time and things are fine in that set of relationships at this point, but it’s not a great quality and one I’m on close guard against.

All the grief has also exposed the fault lines in some relationships and the Awful Things People Say.  After my brother died, it’s been a revelation how much stigma suicide really carries and also how uncomfortable some people are with grief and strong emotions.  Those secondary losses were really unexpected and the reshuffling of boundaries has been painful.

The fall-out also shows up with everything related to pregnancy or conception.  I’m afraid to embrace the idea of this final embryo transfer – even when I know, no matter how things fall out, I will be okay – because the whole thing activates all the panic responses and pushes me back to thinking on all the other memories.  When I was pregnant with M, my OB wound up allowing me to have appointments weekly through the first trimester, until both the risk of pregnancy loss had gone down and I could pick up the heartbeat on my home fetal doppler.  I was having panic attacks I couldn’t get under control, despite knowing I would manage no matter what the outcome.  It was awful and I’m really grateful that my OB was so kind.

And perhaps that’s one other little silver lining to the tough stuff: I’ve had the opportunity to see people step up to the plate as well.  People who have gone above and beyond and helped so much.  It gives me faith in humanity, in the idea that there is goodness out there.  It helps me better identify where I can be that goodness for others.

All this to say: it’s a mixed bag.  What doesn’t kill me has made me stronger and weaker…and panic attacks…and exposed my limitations along with my less than awesome qualities…and brought out some of my good ones.  But I guess that doesn’t fit as nicely on a coffee mug.

Infertility, Stigma, and Reading

Content note: Infertility portrayed in very problematic ways – possibly not the post to read if you’re in a tough place right now.

It’s old news now, but a month or so ago I read the Slate article that has been making the rounds in the infertility community – for good reason, it’s an excellent article hitting up a wide variety of issues and reasons infertility is particularly tricky when it comes to the workplace.  It also gets into how, despite more openness and acceptance for infertility, there’s still a very long way to go.

Since my own experiences with infertility/miscarriage, I’ve definitely noticed storylines or even short bits in books/films/TV relating to adoption/loss/infertility (ALI) far more than I did before.  While infertility is becoming more realistically depicted at times, I’m still somewhat surprised at how often I run across a particular trope that I strongly dislike: that women struggling with infertility/loss are scary.

Perhaps it’s because this came up in two books I read recently: The Alice Network (Kate Quinn) and Daughters of the Lake (Wendy Webb).

The Alice Network is largely about the female spy network that operated during WWI in France, interspersed with a young woman searching for her lost cousin in the wake of her brother’s suicide post WWII.  All the trigger warnings apply on this book both from the ALI perspective (unplanned pregnancies, abortion, loss) and generally (war, torture, Nazis, rape, etc.).  There’s a short bit, however, for a side character that includes infertility.

[Very minor spoiler ahead]

Spy trainer Captain Cameron went to jail because his wife decided to commit insurance fraud to provide for a child she couldn’t conceive.  Her infertility causes her to go to desperate, not entirely sane, lengths.  She conceives and recovers her mind.

[End spoiler]

Honestly, despite how much I was immersed in the rest of the story, this part almost made me put it down because it infuriated me so much.

Shortly thereafter, I picked up Wendy Webb’s Daughters of the Lake, a gothic suspense novel, on sale at some point and finally got around to reading it.  It’s definitely a ghost story, but in a mildly shivery sort of way that I enjoyed (I then promptly picked up a couple of her other books from the library and those descend into terrifying outright horror stories – this one I found much milder).

The novel had a baby/baby loss subplot, however.  Again, the theme of women deranged by loss and not having a child came up toward the end of the book.

Even setting aside artistic license and drama in novels, this Dear Prudence letter headlined “Help!  Sometimes I Worry That My Infertile Friend Wants to Kidnap My Baby” (I would not click over if you’re in a fragile place because yes, this accurately sums up the substance of the letter).  Prudie calls the letter writer’s comment to the friend unkind and gives the letter writer a thorough tongue lashing, but the letter itself definitely displays a truly alarming attitude toward those struggling with infertility.

I am so tired of women struggling to conceive or dealing with loss being portrayed as dangerous or harmful.  Infertility made me feel a lot of emotions.  Sad.  Angry.  Conflicted.  Anxious.  Frustrated.  Jealous.  Certainly these and many more, but while it’s true that I chose not to attend baby showers, disliked pregnancy announcements for the most part, and had to unfollow streams with lots of new baby/child pictures at times, I never wanted to harm anyone.  I never wanted to take anyone’s baby.  I never lost touch with reality.  I never wished that difficulty or sadness would befall anyone.  I’m not going to say that no one was ever disappointed in my reactions or that a few people insisted that I should be visibly overjoyed for pregnant women, but I tried – hard – to be kind and keep my feelings to myself in public.  Mostly because it wasn’t other people’s fault and I knew they weren’t having babies at me.  I just wished it was my turn and that conceiving had been easier (and – not going to lie – highly resented the amount of money we were shelling out for IVF).

This is why I write about infertility, in the hopes that reality will help to dispel some of the more pernicious bits of stigma surrounding this condition.  But it doesn’t help when a scene giving a picture so much to the contrary are popping up in a novel as widely read as The Alice Network.

Thinking Through my IVF/RE Experiences: Part 2

This is the second part of my coming to terms with my IVF/infertility treatment experiences, picking up when I switched doctors.  Read Part One here.

I’ve written in a Q&A format, mostly because that seemed easier than trying to form this as one narrative piece.

What was the difference between the first and second RE?

I switched because my second RE was the doctor who “officially” diagnosed my miscarriage.  He was kind and compassionate through that awful moment and promised that he would *personally* talk to my OB/GYN to help arrange the D&C.  I was super surprised the next day when my OB/GYN told me that 2nd RE had, in fact, actually called and talked to OB/GYN.  It was probably one of the first times I’d been promised something in that office and it actually happened.

I mean, that was the biggest difference.  2nd RE actually followed through on his word consistently.

I also appreciated the fact that 2nd RE wasn’t nearly as uncomfortable with the really strong emotions that come with IVF as 1st RE (2nd RE was a lot younger than 1st RE, so I wonder if that played a role).  After my ectopic/miscarriage (following my FET), I walked in for the follow up appointment loaded for bear, so to speak.  I cried for pretty much an hour plus, and I really appreciate that he didn’t try to cut me off or tell me that it was okay, we could try again.  He told me that it made total sense that I was upset, that we did need to take a break at this point.  Also, he was in favor of limiting the number of IVFs – 3 fresh was his personal max in my situation, and as he put it, that was only if we wanted to go that far at all.  It was helpful to hear that he wasn’t advocating for more and more and more and that it was okay to say enough.  In that follow-up, we decided we’d do one more round of fresh IVF, but if that failed, we were probably done.  He supported that decision.

2nd RE also was willing to try things that helped me get through.  I asked, prior to my FET, if my embryos could be grown out to blastocyst stage (they were frozen at 3-day) prior to transfer – and if they couldn’t get that far, then at least I’d be spared the 2 week wait.  Even though this wasn’t clinic protocol, he was fine with that.  He also would call me personally if things were changing/not going well/etc.

Did things go perfectly after that?

No, I mean, there were still communication issues at times between staff in the clinic, but it was better.

What helped?

I mean, honestly, it’s amazing how far listening and basic compassion goes.  Don’t sell false hope.  Follow through on your promises.  Keep in communication with patients.  Respect limits and boundaries.  None of this is reinventing the wheel – it’s stuff clinicians should be doing.  Unfortunately, it’s time consuming, and I think this is where problems come up.  My clinic offered a complimentary session with an infertility counselor with IVF, but it’s not really enough.  It’s not something that can be entirely outsourced – the doctors and staff at clinics have to be involved.

One thing 2nd RE did that I found helpful was that he gave me his personal work email – the one that went directly to him.  Funny enough, I never wound up using it.  But it took a HUGE load off me mentally to know that if I had one of those questions that wasn’t serious enough to call the on-call physician at 2am but was bothering me, I could send an email.  It also helped to know I could contact him using my own words and not have to rely on someone else passing the message along.

Also, when 2nd RE had bad or mixed news, he would sit down with us – I mean, physically, sit down.  I know this sounds sort of strange, but it helped because he wasn’t sort of “standing over” us and could make eye contact that way.

What are some thoughts on clinics and the experience?

I think one thing I would say to infertility clinics/staff is that even a single failed cycle, whether that’s IVF, IUI, whatever, can represent an enormous loss to the patient.  It’s time lost, emotional endurance lost, and as crass as it feels to mention money, it can be a big financial loss.  I mean, a single cycle of IUI or TI with injected fertility meds for me cost around $800-$2500, plus the time and emotion that goes into it.  Even clom.id or fem.ara, with timed intercourse, while cheaper, still ran about $150-$300 including the ultrasounds.  That’s not impossible, but it’s not an inconsiderable expense either.  By the time my husband and I got through infertility treatments, we had spent >$40,000.  For perspective, we spent about as much on a down payment for a 4-bedroom house + some new furniture + some new flooring.  We don’t live in a super expensive area, admittedly, but it’s still a boggling comparison.  Having a cycle fail doesn’t just mean all the emotional losses (which are considerable as well) but also a sickening amount of money and financial stability in many cases.

I was really grateful when the fertility clinic I used took down all the baby collages that patients could see.  I’m fine with clinics having stuff like that in strictly staff-only areas, but I remember really clearly passing the “baby board” with my miscarried fetus still hanging out in my uterus and feeling like someone had kicked me in the face.  I did not find it “hopeful” or helpful to have those out.  It made me feel like a defective failure.

It would also be nice to see “success” and “failure” re-defined when it comes to infertility.  I’m not a “success” because I had kids – I have absolutely no idea how I managed to pull that one out.  In other words, it’s not because I did something “right” or “wrong”, it’s just how things worked out.  Likewise, I wasn’t a failure when my cycles weren’t working and I miscarried twice in a row.  I would love to see clinics be much more mindful of patients as whole human beings who have intrinsic worth and dignity regardless of whether or not they have children.  I view success – when it comes to infertility – to be comprised of having a life one considers full and meaningful no matter what that looks like.  Basically, coming out on the other side is a huge victory.

Bangs Head On Desk

microblog_mondays

(TW for pregnancy discussion – not mine)

A couple of my guilty pleasures include celebrity gossip and the British Royal Family (I actually took my pen name here from one of Henry VIII’s wives).  Needless to say, I’ve spent some time reading about Eugenie’s wedding (loved the tiara) over the last few days, and of course, the in-the-news-constantly right now Meghan Markle.

Until this morning, when I saw the headline.

Yup.  She’s pregnant.

OF COURSE.

It’s weird how trauma stuff comes out.  Most of the time, I’m fairly at peace with the infertility, IVF, miscarriage and such.  I just don’t react as strongly as when I was in the trenches.

Pregnancy is my kryptonite, though.  Pregnancy announcements still feel like being socked in the gut.  I generally don’t look at maternity photos.  Ultrasound scan photos actually can get me closer than I’d like to panic attacks (for a very long time, I got a lot of bad news in ultrasound rooms).  Seeing pregnant bellies still fills me with a sort of wistful, slightly jealous longing.  I don’t go to baby showers.  I don’t do pregnancy/labor/delivery stories because, let’s face it, no one wants to hear about infertility/miscarriage/severe pregnancy complications/premature birth.

It’s strange because I can hold newborns or look at baby/kid pictures without any issues the vast majority of the time.  I’m okay once the child is born.  But pregnancy stuff, for some reason, gets to me in a major way.

It’s weird coincidental timing, though, since today is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day (in the US).

So I read about pregnancy.

And light the candles in memory of the ones I lost.

This post is part of Microblog Mondays.  If you want to read more, head over to Stirrup Queens!  Thanks to Mel for originating and hosting.